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Advances in Motion provides health care professionals with information about the latest breakthroughs, research and clinical advances from Massachusetts General Hospital.

Featured In Neuroscience

Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital have identified some of the earliest brain changes associated with the risk to develop Alzheimer's disease by studying a kindred with the PSEN1 E280A gene mutation.

Featured In Cardiovascular

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused an immense strain on health care institutions across the world. Thor Sundt, MD, discusses how the Division of Cardiac Surgery at Massachusetts General Hospital utilized a multidisciplinary approach to respond to the COVID-19 crisis.

Featured In Research and Innovation

Emery Brown, MD, PhD, answers questions about a new joint MIT/Mass General research center that he's leading. He aims to integrate neuroscience into the study of anesthesia to create new approaches to managing anesthesia and treating common neuropsychiatric disorders such as insomnia, depression and coma recovery.

Featured In Otolaryngology

Faisal Karmali, PhD, Richard F. Lewis, MD, and colleagues at Mass Eye and Ear showed in monkeys that a semicircular canal implant improved head orientation after severe vestibular damage, suggesting implants mimicking canal function can improve spatial orientation and balance in patients with vestibular hypofunction.

Featured In Orthopaedics

Aditya V. Karhade, MD, MBA, Joseph H. Schwab, MD, MS, and colleagues found free-text discharge summary notes have the greatest utility in a natural language processing algorithm for predicting the risk of readmission after posterior lumbar fusion. Progress notes had the least utility.

The Latest Digestive Health Advances

A 24-year-old woman with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome, small fiber neuropathy, and impaired gastrointestinal (GI) motility presented with recurrent blood infections and bacteria in her gut. The Pathways Team investigated a relationship between the patient's neuropathy and recurrent GI bacterial infections.

In a large prospective cohort of U.S. women, Massachusetts General Hospital researchers found that a higher intake of red meat contributed to a significant, dose-dependent increased risk of developing nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and this association was largely mediated by obesity.

Contributing Physicians

Director of the Center for Neurointestinal Health, Massachusetts General Hospital

Dr. Kuo

Hepatologist, Division of Gastroenterology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School

Advances Specialties

Cardiovascular

Thoralf Sundt, MD, and Evin Yucel, MD, of the Corrigan Minehan Heart Center, and colleagues recently reviewed the state-of-the-art management of patients with drug use–associated infective endocarditis, stressing the need for a multidisciplinary approach that incorporates addiction treatment.

Oncology

Researchers at the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center and colleagues have identified mutations that make lung cancer resistant to adagrasib and other KRAS-G12C inhibitors. Their findings provide clues to designing next-generation inhibitors and combination regimens.

Pulmonary and Critical Care

Researchers at the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center and colleagues have identified mutations that make lung cancer resistant to adagrasib and other KRAS-G12C inhibitors. Their findings provide clues to designing next-generation inhibitors and combination regimens.

Education & Training Opportunities

June 15, 2022 - July 13, 2022

The Massachusetts General Hospital Corrigan Minehan Heart Center prepares future health care professionals and trains providers in innovative therapies and care. As part of these efforts, the center hosts regular Grand Rounds presentations from thought leaders and researchers on important cardiology topics. Cardiology Grand Rounds is open to all healthcare professionals.

September 29, 2022 - October 1, 2022

The Minimally Invasive and Novel Therapeutics (MINT) In Foregut Disease continuing medical education (CME) event, taking place from September 29-October 1, 2022, seeks to equip clinicians with knowledge of the latest physiologic tools needed to diagnose and treat benign foregut disease, and to teach them how different treatment options fit within the paradigm of overall foregut disease.

Clinical Trials

In Neuroscience

The study involves multiple visits over 6 months. You will complete an 8-week stress reduction treatment that includes a medical device worn in the ear and attend MRI and PET scans. You will also complete daily migraine diaries online.

In Cardiovascular

We are seeking individuals who self-identify as having high stress to participate in a randomized study using a mindfulness-based, stress-reduction intervention and PET-MR imaging.