Skip to content

In This Video

  • Massachusetts General physicians presented on the podium, moderated sessions and showcased posters at the American Heart Association's 2018 Scientific Sessions
  • From new cholesterol guidelines to novel treatment approaches, some of those physicians discuss what they consider to be the most interesting topic at the conference

Mass General physicians presented on the podium, moderated sessions or showcased posters at the American Heart Association's 2018 Scientific Sessions. From new cholesterol guidelines to novel treatment approaches, some of those physicians discuss what they consider to be the most interesting topic at the conference in this video.

Transcript

Anthony Rosenzweig, MD, chief of Cardiology: So I think there's a tremendous amount of exciting science and clinical research being presented at this year's American Heart Association including new guidelines for cholesterol management and exercise as well as some late-breaking clinical trials looking at things like the use of Entresto in different populations, not just the heart failure, but the reduced ejection fraction population, as well as the ability to reduce triglycerides with EPA, for example, to improve cardiac outcomes.

Sawalla Guseh, MD, cardiology fellow: Some of the things that I've been particularly interested in have been the talks on exercise intensity and exercise dose and how we might be able to…to use variations of exercise as a medicine.

Matthew Nayor, MD, heart failure cardiologist: The broad uptake of using exercise as a physiologic probe to unmask physiologic abnormalities early in the disease course is becoming more widespread and is very encouraging.

Amy Sarma, MD, cardiologist: The most interesting topic at this year's AHA and something that I've been looking forward to is hearing the new lipid guidelines and all the discussion and data surrounding them.

Michael Osborne, MD, cardiologist: The new cholesterol guidelines are extremely important because they facilitate the prescribing and utility of PCSK9 inhibitors on a much broader basis and allow us to get these very, very effective drugs to our patients more easily.

Pradeep Natarajan, MD, MMSc, director of Preventive Cardiology: The REDUCE-IT trial was probably the highlight trial for us. The REDUCE-IT trial was comprised of individuals who had atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease or had diabetes and additional risk factors.

Krishna Aragam, MD, MS, cardiologist: As a preventive cardiologist, I was particularly interested in hearing about triglyceride lowering and anti inflammatory therapies as they pertain to cardiovascular prevention and really adding to our armamentarium of therapies to prevent cardiovascular disease.

Matthew Nayor, MD, heart failure cardiologist: As a heart failure clinician, I'm also very encouraged by the results of the PIONEER-HF study, which used sacubitril valsartan in patients with acute decompensated heart failure during that initial hospitalization and showed a superiority to the standard of care now, which is ACE inhibitors.

Collin Stultz, MD, PhD: If you compare what's going on this year relative to last year, there are a plethora of presentations and posters and people who are using large data sets to try to understand things about patients.

Anthony Rosenzweig, MD, chief of Cardiology: I think we're really learning a tremendous amount about how we can improve both the prevention and treatment of heart disease.

Related

Health care professionals at this year’s American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions discussed late-breaking research, innovative treatment approaches and brand new guidelines. The conversations carried over from the podium and conference halls onto Twitter.

Related

Pradeep Natarajan, MD, MMSc, weighs in on the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association's updated guidelines on cholesterol management.