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In This Video

  • Massachusetts General Hospital cardiologists were asked what their 2019 new years resolution is regarding their research and care
  • In this video, they give a variety of answers from bring their research back to their patients, increasing enrollment in clinical trials, better identifying patients and families at risk for cardiomyopathy and heart failure, establishing an artificial intelligence center to recommend optimal treatments, further knowledge of cardiovascular disease in pregnancy, and continuing the Mass General Heart Center’s incredibly powerful collaborations amongst colleagues

Massachusetts General Hospital cardiologists were asked what their 2019 New Year's resolution is regarding their research and care. In this video, they give a variety of answers from bring their research back to their patients, increasing enrollment in clinical trials, better identifying patients and families at risk for cardiomyopathy and heart failure, establishing an artificial intelligence center to recommend optimal treatments, further knowledge of cardiovascular disease in pregnancy, and continuing the Mass General Heart Center’s incredibly powerful collaborations amongst colleagues.

Transcript

Anthony Rosenzweig, MD, chief of Cardiology: So I have several resolutions. I guess, like all of us. Exercising more and eating less is certainly one of them. But more seriously, as a researcher and clinician and the chief of the division, what I'd like to do in this coming year, is to really think both on the research side and the clinical side of what the most important thing we can do to improve the care we can provide our patients is and then reflect on whether we're, in fact, doing that.

Pradeep Natarajan, MD, MMSc, director of Preventive Cardiology: My New Year's resolution is to focus on bringing our research back to our patients.

Matthew Nayor, MD, heart failure cardiologist: My New Year's resolution is to continue and hopefully ramp up enrollment in a very exciting study that we have looking at the metabolic changes with cardiac rehab in patients with different forms of cardiac disease.

Krishna Aragam, MD, MS, cardiologist: From a clinical standpoint, my New Year's resolution is to expand my panel in the cardiovascular genetics space, particularly looking at cardiomyopathy genetics, and to not only identify and manage patients who come to me in clinic at-risk for cardiomyopathy, but then to also reach out to relevant family members who might also be at-risk for disease, so that we might screen people more efficiently at scale and better identify a greater number of individuals in the population who are at-risk of developing heart failure.

Collin Stultz, MD, PhD, cardiologist: My New Year's resolution is to establish a center which leverages the expertise both at Massachusetts General Hospital and MIT, whose goal is to develop methods that can use the vast information in the electronic health record to recommend optimal treatments for complex patients with cardiovascular disease.

Amy Sarma, MD, cardiologist: My New Year's resolution is to further our knowledge in cardiovascular disease in pregnancy and I think that Mass General's participation in the HOPE Registry will be critical to this.

Michael Osborne, MD, cardiologist: My New Year's resolution is to continue to collaborate closely with my colleagues on both the clinical and research fronts. I have found that the incredibly powerful relationships that you can develop with incredibly talented colleagues have allowed me to answer questions and address issues for both patients and research that I would have never been able to do on my own.

Sawalla Guseh, MD, cardiology fellow: My New Year's resolution is to read more, to prioritize and to put together an impactful scientific story.

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